Letter: Reality and numbers of Weaponness Valley coach park development

We are told that there is great enthusiasm for their September openings, but I have not seen any mention of what level their intake is going to be.
We are told that there is great enthusiasm for their September openings, but I have not seen any mention of what level their intake is going to be.

I cannot accept the enthusiasm of the education leaders over the unwanted, by the residents overlooking the development, of the two horrendous buildings that have appeared so close to the properties of Weaponness Valley Road.

From our prospective, they are ugly and more suited to an industrial estate rather than a residential area. I used to sit in my lounge and look over the roofs of the properties below me and on to the old coach park. In summer there could be up to 50 coaches parked there waiting to collect their passengers from the pick up point by the Spa Bridge. Now they will all have to negotiate their way through the traffic light strangled streets of the town centre to reach William Street coach park.

I could see people exercising their dogs off the lead with no fear of them running into busy traffic, children playing with radio controlled toys, and learner drivers getting their first outing behind the wheel to achieve control of a car before venturing out onto the busy roads.

Now we are told that there is great enthusiasm for their September openings, but I have not seen any mention of what level their intake is going to be.

For the benefit of their business plans I must point out that the population of Scarborough is predominantly elderly, that to the north we have the vast unpopulated area of the North Yorkshire Moors, to the south the rolling hills of the Wolds with vast swathes of rape seed oil fields, and to the west we have the agricultural area of the Vale of York, with its majority industry of racing stables, and I don’t know of many jockeys and stable hands with engineering training.

Then to the east we have the North Sea with shoals (not schools) of fish, and with our local fishermen on the brink of extinction I cannot see much requirement for the university training college with them.

Add in the fact that last week saw the announcement that the University Training College Lancashire, based in Burnley, is closing on August 31 after an occupation rate of only 14.1 per cent having only been in operation for two years. And that is an area of Lancashire with a large catchment area, including factories for BAE.

Hackney University Training College closed in July 2014 because it could not attract pupils.

Black Country University Training College closed in 2015 after a disappointing Ofstead report and occupation rate of only 14 per cent. I now await with interest to see how long the

Scarborough University Training College will survive, and if it does at what cost to the Sixth Form College and Yorkshire Coast College.

As regards the university, if I was applying to attend a city based organisation I would have doubts about accepting a place a hundred miles from it.

Hull University tried it and by pulling out seem to have admitted that it was a failure.

Bring into all these facts the statement by a local headteacher on a TV news channel that the main difficulty his school faced was that he was unable to recruit the right quality of teachers to come to Scarborough, and we seem to have a recipe for disaster.

That will particularly be for the property owners of the area who will now have to live with these abortions, whether they are occupied or not.

I regrettably foresee them joining the rush to expand and create the disaster that we now have on the A64 entrance to the town, the empty headquarters building of the now defunct Scarborough Building Society.

RM Hird

Trinity Gardens

Scarborough